Saturday, February 8, 2014

2014 Chicago Auto Show: Nation's Largest Auto Show Opens its Doors to the Public

We got to ride in this last 2013 Chicago Auto Show.  We are looking forward to this year's Chicago Auto Show!
The 2014 Chicago Auto Show opens to the public on Saturday, Feb. 8. The opening weekend of the show promises an exciting line-up of events with hundreds of different vehicles on display throughout, more than 1 million square feet of show floor space, three indoor test track and six outdoor test drives. The show runs from Feb. 8-17 and is open from 10 a.m. until 10 p.m. each day, with the exception of the last day, where the show will close at 8 p.m.

This year marks the 106th edition of the Chicago Auto Show. First staged in 1901, the Chicago Auto Show is the largest auto show in North America and has been held more times than any other auto exposition on the continent. 

“The 2014 Chicago Auto Show is the best place to see and experience the newest vehicles under one roof,” said Kurt Schiele, 2014 Chicago Auto Show chairman. “Attendees will be surprised to see the new innovative designs in vehicles and the latest technology to enhance their in-car experience.”

New this year, show-goers can follow the Chicago Auto Show on social media and participate in the #CASChallenge Social Media Scavenger Hunt. Participants will have the chance to win more than 100 prizes throughout the show, as well as entered to win the grand prize, a 7-night cruise provided by Celebrity Cruises and $500 in spending money from Cars.com.
Not that every day isn’t a special day at the Chicago Auto Show, but there are a few special programs during the show’s 10-day run. Special days at the 2014 Chicago Auto Show include:
  • Women’s Day: Tuesday, Feb. 11.  Women will be admitted for just $6.  Manufactures will present women-oriented programs on the purchase and lease of cars and maintenance. 
  • Chicago Auto Show Food Drive: Feb. 12-14.  Show patrons who bring three cans of food will receive a coupon for half-priced admission.  All food will be donated to A Safe Haven Foundation.
  • Telemundo Hispanic Day: Friday, Feb. 14.  On Telemundo Hispanic Day, Chicago Auto Show exhibitors develop and host Hispanic-flavored events.  For more information about scheduled events, visithttp://www.telemundochicago.com.
  • Family Day: Monday, Feb. 17.  The Chicago Auto Show will host family fun on Presidents Day.  Again this year, Family Day is expected to be a great end to the nation’s largest auto show.
General admission to the 2014 Chicago Auto Show is $12 for adults (ages 13-61), $6 for children (ages 7-12) and $6 for senior citizens (ages 62 and up). Any child 6 years or younger may enter the show free of charge when accompanied by a paying adult. Weekday discount tickets, which are $6 off general adult admission tickets, are available at area new-car dealers, participating Fifth Third bank locations and Shell gas stations. 

For more information about the Chicago Auto Show, please visit www.chicagoautoshow.com.

Thursday, February 6, 2014

10 reasons to meet the cast of Downton Abbey on set in London

The cast of Downton Abbey  posted a new video about helping the victims of the Tsunami in the Philippines. The video is amusing especially when keeping in mind that they’re supporting something so serious. They’re actually giving away the chance to spend the day on set with the cast.





Tuesday, February 4, 2014

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Friday, January 17, 2014

How might we address income inequality, the civil rights issue of our time?

HOPE Credit Union, a bank with a twist. A success story in the Mississippi Delta.

When banks started disappearing in the Mississippi Delta, turning low and mid-income communities into "bank deserts," William Bynum turned despair into hope by founding a new sort of bank.


Thursday, January 16, 2014

Newseum Opens “1964: Civil Rights at 50” Exhibit Featuring Powerful Photographs of Freedom Summer

Student civil rights activists join hands and sing as they prepare to leave Ohio to register black voters in Mississippi. The 1964 voter registration campaign was known as Freedom Summer. Photo Credit: Ted Polumbaum/Newseum collection

 On Friday, Jan. 17, the Newseum will open “1964: Civil Rights at 50,” a yearlong exhibit about Freedom Summer, a bold campaign organized by civil rights groups in 1964 to register black voters in Mississippi.

“1964” features powerful images of Freedom Summer, from volunteer training sessions in Ohio to clashes with segregationists and the search for three missing civil rights workers who were later found murdered. The photographs were taken by Ted Polumbaum, a freelance photographer working for Time magazine, whose passion for social justice led him to Mississippi in the summer of 1964. The Polumbaum photographs are part of the Newseum’s permanent collection was on display in the exhibit through Dec. 28, 2014.

“The exhibit powerfully illustrates the risks that student activists took 50 years ago to defeat segregation,” said Cathy Trost, vice president of exhibits and programs at the Newseum. “Photojournalist Ted Polumbaum recorded the dramatic events of Freedom Summer and left behind a remarkable collection of images capturing key moments in the fight for civil rights.”
On Jan. 18, at 2:30 p.m., Nyna Brael Polumbaum and Judy Polumbaum, Ted Polumbaum’s widow and daughter, will discuss his photographs and legacy as part of the museum’s Inside Media series. The program is included with paid admission to the Newseum.

Over a 40-year career, Ted Polumbaum (1924-2001) covered some of the biggest stories of his time, including the civil rights movement and Vietnam War protests, for the newsmagazines Time, Life and The Saturday Evening Post.In 2003, his widow, Nyna Brael Polumbaum, donated more than 200,000 of his images to the Newseum’s collection.

“1964” is a companion exhibit to “Make Some Noise: Students and the Civil Rights Movement,” which opened at the Newseum in August 2013. “Make Some Noise” spotlights key figures in the student civil rights movement, including John Lewis, now a U.S. representative from Georgia, and Julian Bond, who later became chairman of the NAACP. The exhibit also features a section of the original F.W. Woolworth lunch counter in Greensboro, N.C., where in 1960 four African American college students launched the sit-in movement, and a bronze casting of the Birmingham, Ala., jail cell door behind which the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. penned his famous “Letter From Birmingham Jail” in 1963.

The Newseum’s Digital Classroom website features a free learning module called “Making a Change,” which explores the civil rights movement through the lenses of historical connections, media literacy, and civics and citizenship using videos, archival news footage and interviews. These standards-aligned lesson plans will help teachers enhance student engagement with Newseum content, their communities and their peers across the country.

Contributing sponsorship support for “Civil Rights at 50” has been provided by Walmart and Altria.

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